Light, Fast and Crisp- TFO BVK Spey

By Temple Fork Outfitters

Arrive at any boat ramp, or lodge from Northern California to British Columbia and you’ll see some of the finest two-handed rods ever built.

From traditional lines, to modern scandi lines and mid-bellies, this three-rod BVK family features a faster, stiffer feel that melds perfectly with swift, touch-and-go style casts.

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The BVK two-handed rod getting a workout on the Oregon coast. Photo by Oliver Sutro. 

The 12’8” 6-weight, (400 to 600 grains), rod is the stand-out dry line/summer run rod for steelhead. Ideal for floating tips and dry line work in Oregon and Nor. Calif.

Middle of the fairway grainage on this rod should be about 425-480.

There is a reason why 13-foot, 7-weight two-handed rods are so popular. They can cover just about any species specific technique, whether it’s battling steep banks or wind ripping up the canyon from your favorite run, this rod is small enough to cast in tight quarters while maintaining enough length to lift longer lines off of the water. The ideal grain window for the 7-weight, are lines between 450-650 grains, with the sweet spot being 480-575 grains.

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The ideal rod for mid-length heads and lines. The BVK Spey can effectively handle everything from traditional style flies, to medium size intruders. Photo courtesy of Geoffrey Motlow. 

The 13’4” 8-weight, (500 to 700-grains) model has a thin profile, and a light in hand feel, but, make no mistake it was built to handle big water and big fish. Triple density, floating lines and a variety of longer line approaches feel right at home on this rod. For those who desire to go after big salmon and steelhead in deep, fast water with big flies, heavy heads and tips, these rods have the power for the job.

Rods are finished with Tactical Series stripping guides and ultra-lightweight chromium impregnated stripping guides. A trimmed down, reconstituted cork handle allows for ergonomic handling and durability in the wettest fishing conditions.

BVK two-handed models retail for $485.95-$495.95.

For more information please contact Temple Fork Outfitters at, info@tforods.com or by telephone, (800) 638-9052.

 

 

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TFO Unveils BVK Spey Rod Series

By Nicholas Conklin, Temple Fork Outfitters

Arrive at any boat ramp, or lodge from Northern California to British Columbia and you’ll see some of the finest two-handed rods ever built.

Not only do these meticulously finished rods cast well, they make no qualms about bringing the fight to the fish. That is exactly the mindset we tried to replicate with the BVK family of two-handed rods.

From traditional lines, to modern scandi lines and mid-bellies, this three-rod BVK family features a faster, stiffer feel that melds perfectly with swift, touch-and-go style casts.

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Think light and responsive. The BVK family of spey rods are ideal for touch-and-go casts and those throwing longer heads and lines. Photo courtesy TFO.

The 12’8” 6-weight, (400 to 600 grains), rod is the stand-out dry line/summer run rod for steelhead. Ideal for floating tips and dry line work in the Oregon and North Calif., But also has application in So Cal and Florida gulf as a two-handed overhead rod in the surf. Middle of the fairway grainage on this rod should be about 425-480.

There is a reason why 13-foot, 7-weight two-handed rods are so popular. They can cover just about any species specific technique, whether it’s battling steep banks or wind ripping up the canyon from your favorite run, this rod is small enough to cast in tight quarters while maintaining enough length to lift longer lines off of the water. The ideal grain window for the 7-weight, are lines between 450-650 grains, with the sweet spot being 480-575 grains.

The 13’4” 8-weight, (500 to 700-grains) model has a thin profile, and a light in hand feel, but, make no mistake it was built to handle big water and big fish. Triple density, floating lines and a variety of longer line approaches feel right at home on this rod. For those who desire to go after big salmon and steelhead in deep, fast water with big flies, heavy heads and tips, these rods have the power for the job.

Rods come adorned with Tactical Series stripping guides and ultra-lightweight chromium impregnated stripping guides. A trimmed down, reconstituted cork handle allows for ergonomic handling and durability in the wettest fishing conditions.

BVK two-handed models retail for $485.95-$495.95.

For more information please contact Temple Fork Outfitters at, info@tforods.com or by telephone, (800) 638-9052.

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TFO Ambassador Thom Thornton casting an earlier prototype of the BVK Spey on the Sandy River in Oregon. Photo courtesy of Thom Thornton.

 

 

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Temple Fork Outfitters adds to BVK reel family

During the development stage of the now highly acclaimed BVK series of rods, TFO quickly realized the need for a series of reels to complement the rod’s standards in terms of performance, light-weight, quality and affordability.

After the success of the original four reel sizes, TFO is excited to introduce the new BVK 3+ reel to the family of BVK large arbor reels.

The new BVK 3+ reel features the same solid drag and frame components as the rest of the BVK family of reels. Photo by TFO.

The new BVK 3+ reel features the same solid drag and frame components as the rest of the BVK family of reels.
Photo by TFO.

BVK reels are precision machined from bar stock aluminum. The moss green anodized frames and spools are ported to eliminate excess weight. Equally at home in both fresh and salt waters, the super large arbor design provides faster line pick up and helps the maintenance free drag system work at a more constant pressure than standard arbor reels.

Delrin/Stainless stacked discs make the drag silky smooth and the one way clutch bearing makes engagement instant and left to right hand conversion simple.

BVK reels are available in moss green only and the 3+ size retails for $299.95. Spare spools are also available and retail for $169.95.

For more information on the BVK family of reels and Temple Fork Outfitters, please visit www.tforods.com.

 

 

 

The ultralight BVK 3+ can accomodate fly lines up to 10-weight and 225-yards of backing.  Photo by TFO.

The ultralight BVK 3+ can accomodate fly lines up to 10-weight and 225-yards of backing.
Photo by TFO.

 

The Most Common Rod Break You’ve Never Heard of

All fishing rods are not created equal.

Rods are made from a mixture of composite fibers such as S-Glass and Kevlar and combined with graphite, can almost bend to the point where they can be tied into a knot. While these rods are almost indestructible, they lack the capacity to cast long distances and have poor sensitivity.

Here, an angler puts far to much pressure on the tip of the rod. This not only increases failure rate, but always puts unnecessary pressure on the angler.

Here, an angler puts far to much pressure on the tip of the rod. This not only increases failure rate, but always puts unnecessary pressure on the angler.

This is not the case with high modulus carbon rods. While they can offer maximum casting distances and ultimate sensitivity for an angler, there are limitations in amount of bend that can be applied to these rods.

High modulus carbon rods cannot withstand the abuse and stress that lower modulus and spiral wrapped graphite rods can handle.

We often see rods sent in for warranty attached with an angry note, blaming us for their rod failing.

WRONG! In almost all circumstances it is not the rod that failed, rather, the angle at which the angler chose to fight the fish.

When these breaks, called “hi-stick” breaks, occur it is often do to the angler choosing to fight the fish off of the tip of the rod rather than the butt.

“High sticking,” a fishing rod is when you pull back on the rod so far that the rod forms more than a 90 degree angle to the water. There is no doubt that the higher the modulus of a carbon rod, (like the BVK rod); the easier it is to break the rod and the less (angler) abuse that it can endure.

Below are three links to outside sources that can validate issue’s common breakage issues associated with any high modulus graphite rod.

flyrodreel.com/magazine/2009/january/ask

www.torquedfishing.com/HighSticking.pdf

americanangler.com/technique/busted

All-female team of anglers compete in TPST

The Tres Pescados Slam Tournament, (TPST) that was held this past  Aug. was another success, as anglers from around the world participated in the three-day tournament.

As the original and only current Central American fly fishing slam tournament, the end goal in this yearly event is to help raise funds to preserve  local fisheries. 

Photo courtesy Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy Courtney Marie Martin.

TFO friend and hardcore fly angler Courtney Marie Martin finished tenth out of 20 teams in the event, spending most of the tournament fishing her BVK 8-weight and Mangrove Series 9wt.

Courtney fished with Capt Lacey Kelly as part of team BelizeFly.com. Competing as the only all female team, Courtney and Lacey fished mostly 15-foot leaders with 16-pound tippet. Hot flies during the event were mainly shrimp and crab patterns

Here is the report from Courtney:

“The people of Belize and Honduras are some of the most impressive fly casters I’ve ever met, I was so consumed with their culture they are amazing,” Courtney said.

“Our guide, Rojo Lara, put us on fish everyday wading and casting off the bow. All fish were sight casted in tailing schools. Tarpon were skittish because of the wind and didn’t want to come out from the mangrove hammocks they schooled up under.

I hooked one monster permit on the second day just playing around in a deep canal that ran threw a flat full of bones, I was stripping my line back in to recast and it just stopped, I paused for a second because it almost felt like I was and bottom but I knew there was no way. I strip set the hell out of him, he hauled tail straight at the boat and I stripped my line as fast as I could, as soon as he saw the boat he took a hard right on the surface and you could see his dorsal and tail plain as day. He took off, all the stripping flew out pretty, I brought my left hand up to double hand the rod and my finger caught the line on the way up and gave enough pop to bust the leader in half. I will literally have nightmares for the rest of my life… I’ve been invited back next year to fish the tournament.”

Below are some awesome photos of  Courtney during the event.

For more information on the TPST and their work in conservation, tail on over to http://belizefly.com/tpst-tournament/ 

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

 

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

 

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

Photo courtesy of Courtney Marie Martin.

BVK Review: Texas FlyCaster

We always like to hear honest, (albeit positive) reviews of our rods and reels.

The folks over at Texas Flycaster, took some time to do a write-up on the BVK series of rods. BVK closeup

Here is a brief excerpt, for more,  check out: http://goo.gl/aRwOH

” Throwing the BVK comes on the heels of throwing the new Winston GVX only a few short days ago. You may recall that I guessed, from what I had read, the BVK was going to be competitive with the Winston, and that the BVK would have a firmer backbone. Not only does it have backbone, for my feel and cast, that backbone reaches pretty far up the blank. Distance and accuracy go to the BVK. Recoil-to-dead ratio feels like a tie between the Winston and TFO …”