Temple Fork Outfitters adds to BVK reel family

During the development stage of the now highly acclaimed BVK series of rods, TFO quickly realized the need for a series of reels to complement the rod’s standards in terms of performance, light-weight, quality and affordability.

After the success of the original four reel sizes, TFO is excited to introduce the new BVK 3+ reel to the family of BVK large arbor reels.

The new BVK 3+ reel features the same solid drag and frame components as the rest of the BVK family of reels. Photo by TFO.

The new BVK 3+ reel features the same solid drag and frame components as the rest of the BVK family of reels.
Photo by TFO.

BVK reels are precision machined from bar stock aluminum. The moss green anodized frames and spools are ported to eliminate excess weight. Equally at home in both fresh and salt waters, the super large arbor design provides faster line pick up and helps the maintenance free drag system work at a more constant pressure than standard arbor reels.

Delrin/Stainless stacked discs make the drag silky smooth and the one way clutch bearing makes engagement instant and left to right hand conversion simple.

BVK reels are available in moss green only and the 3+ size retails for $299.95. Spare spools are also available and retail for $169.95.

For more information on the BVK family of reels and Temple Fork Outfitters, please visit www.tforods.com.

 

 

 

The ultralight BVK 3+ can accomodate fly lines up to 10-weight and 225-yards of backing.  Photo by TFO.

The ultralight BVK 3+ can accomodate fly lines up to 10-weight and 225-yards of backing.
Photo by TFO.

 

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Turn it 90, for Tangle Free Casts

tfo-oval-logo3.jpgBy TFO

Casting out crisp, tight loops can seem simple enough.

Until you get on the water.

bob tangle

The all too common tangle.
Photo by Ed Jaworoski.

Than all of the elements and nuances of the sport come into play. A common on the water issue can be line tangling on guides or wrapping around reels and fighting butts.

However a simple solution can come from those whose livelihood depends on smooth, tangle free casts.

By angling the reel, line is less likley to slap the rod or tangle on a guide while shooting out. Photo Illustration by Ed  Jaworoski.

By angling the reel, line is less likely to slap the rod or tangle on a guide while shooting out.
Photo Illustration by Ed Jaworoski.

Despite the “oh’s” and “ah’s” that the tournament casters can illicit, some useful tricks can be taken from their competition casting.

One of which is turning the reel slightly once a cast is released.

After releasing a cast and line shoots through the guides, rotate your rod 90 degrees. Turing the wrist so that the reel is now in a 90 degree angle from its casting position can accomplish two things.

The first, it lessens the resistance faced as line rips through the guides. The line will naturally move up and down as it travels through the guides. If not rotated, it will slap against the rod as it shoots, causing it to slow down. By turning it 90 degrees, the line will come into much less contact with the rod, thus continuing at a high rate of speed.

Secondly, it can also help cut down on the amount of tangles.

With the reel angled, line is less likely to snag on the reel and guides. An all too common and time consuming issue.